How To TIG Weld Stainless Steel (Some Tips and Tricks)

TIG stands for Tungsten Inert Gas which is a welding technique done with the help of tungsten electrode for heating different metals. The Tig option can be deployed for doing the stainless steel welding task. It can also perform vigorously well for the other metals such as standard steel, nickel alloys, aluminum, bronze, brass, copper, chromoly and even gold.

Stainless steel is a steel alloy that contains chromium–which gives the metal that shine that it is prized for.  Also, stainless steel does not rust or corrode as easily as carbon steel, another property which makes it a popular metal for many TIG welding applications from industrial equipment, food processing, aerospace, and automotive. Stainless can be tricky to weld, but as with most TIG Welding applications, a lot of practice, attention to details and procedure, will have you welding like a pro in no time.

First, you’ll want to watch your heat.  Basic rule of thumb is that you’ll need 1 amp of welding current for every thousandth of an inch of material thickness.  You’ll also want to keep your weld speed up, and maintain good gas coverage.

Second, the molten stainless steel of the weld pool is so reactive to air that you need to exclude the atmosphere from the back of the weld. So as well as the supply of Argon gas from the torch which the welding machine provides, you need to have a pipeline rigged-up which supplies a blanket of Argon along the back of the weld.

Third, you need to select the polarity as well. The user requires playing with the settings in order to setup the unit for performing different jobs on different materials. If aluminum material is to be dealt with then you must bring the polarity at the AC setting. For TIG welding stainless steel, you got to put the polarity setting at the DC Electrode Negative setting which is also given by DCEN.

Fourth, you have to make sure while grinding that you are doing it in the radial direction which is just around the circumference of the Tungsten and it shouldn’t be by the ends in any means. Use the balled tip for AC welding. On the other side for the DC purposes, it should pointed tip. If you are required to produce a butt weld or perhaps an open corner weld then make sure that you ground the tungsten to be of around 5 to 6 mm stick. The gas for the procedure can either be pure Argon or it can be a mixture of Helium-Argon has.

You’ll hear us repeat this often:  use a gas lens!  The gas lens collet body replaces the standard collet body in your TIG torch. It is comprised of a series of layered screens engineered to distribute the gas (generally argon) over the weld zone in a more coherent fashion for better coverage with less turbulence.

BUY QUALITY STAINLESS STEEL TIG RODS AND TIG TROCH WITH PARTS

 

TIG Welding Aluminum for Beginners: Steps 1 & 2

Step 1: Key to Puddle Control: Hand & Torch Placement

Beginning TIG welders unintentionally make a lot scrap. For example, you may feel a need to strike an arc on a piece of aluminum before ever practicing basic hand placement and control. Don’t, as this is a waste of good aluminum. The first step to working with aluminum is to master positioning of the torch and hand.

Hold the torch by bracing it with the base of your hand (from your wrist to the tip of your pinky finger) fla t against the table. Keep it in a steady, forward-moving position with a slight (5- to 15 -degree) backard tilt to the torch. (Figure 1).

image001

Figure 1: Keep the torch in a forward-moving position with a slight 5- to 15-degree backward tilt.

 

Keep a close distance from the tungsten to the workpiece (typically equal to the diameter of the tungsten up to about ¼”). If you pull the tungsten too far away from the workpiece, the arc spreads out too wide and overheats the piece and you lose puddle control (more specifics on this topic to come in Step 3). Working with aluminum is all about puddle control and fighting the fact that it acts like a huge heat sink and rapidly transfers heat away from the weld area ( this is why steel is much more forgiving: the heat stays more localized, which in turn makes it easier to control the puddle).

Step 2: Coordinating Movement and Filler Deposition

Without striking an arc, work on the flow of your hand and torch movement. Practice with gloves on as you would in a normal welding situation. Keep light pressure on your hand, a firm grip of the welding torch and slide your hand across the welding table in an even, steady motion. If you don’t move your hand and you just move your fingers, you’ve become a one- or two-inch welder, and there aren’t many applications where that is useful. This practice helps you “calibrate” hand/torch movement and the distance of the tungsten to the workpiece without creating any scrap.

Filler metal deposition takes place ahead of the TIG torch as you push forward. The torch and the filler rod should roughly be in a 90-degree configuration to each other (Figure 2). Always push a torch—never drag it­—and always introduce the filler metal on the leading edge of the puddle. One hand is smooth and steady as it slides, while the other hand dabs the filler metal. Practice this without striking an arc.

image003

Figure 2: The torch and the filler rod should roughly be in a 90-degree configuration to each other.

Most beginners have issues, at first, getting their hands working independently.  They usually end up moving both hands at the same time: As they attempt to dab the filler metal, the tungsten dips too, which usually results in touching the filler metal to the tungsten and contaminating. Disconnect your hands and brain so that each hand performs its task independently. When you’ve mastered these movements, you’re ready to strike an arc.

(by by Andy Weyenberg, Miller’s motorsports marketing manager, published at www.millerwelds.com)

BUY QUALITY ALUMINUM TIG WELDNG RODS ER4043 AND ER5356

Getting porosity by using Flux Core Gasless welding wire

Q: I bought flux core wire from you people a while back and I have been getting porosity from your flux core wire. Can you explain why?
Answer from WeldingCity: The gasless MIG welding such as E71T-11 and E71T-GS results can be affected by more factors than traditional solid wire welding like ER70S-6, such as welding parameters, surface conditions, plate thickness, machine set-up, work conditions and operations. Enclosed please find the welding parameters suggested from the manufacturer. You may use them as reference and let us know if there is any question. We will forward them to manufacture for further investigation. Also the below customer comment is for a Lincoln Inner shield product which supposedly is one of the best gasless MIG welding wire products in the world. Hopefully it will help.

flux-cored-large-pore-poros

Answer from Manufacture: You are quite right. You use different wires. You also need a different polarity setting on the machine to run gasless flux-cored wire, so this can’t be run on a standard gas only mig. (you need the Dual-Purpose ‘EN’ models). In practice you will find that the standard gas set-up runs much better, especially on thin stuff. It welds a lot smoother & cleaner than the flux-cored wire which tends to burn holes in thin car panels.
A dual purpose machine is handy if you suddenly run out of gas in the middle of a job but you will find that you will be using it in gas mode most of the time on car panels. The Clarke machines are also a good choice out of the hobby MIGs.

 

Can I Weld Aluminum to Steel?

Q: Can I weld aluminum to steel with the GMAW or GTAW welding process?

A: While aluminum can be joined to most other metals relatively easily by adhesive bonding or mechanical fastening, special techniques are required if it is to be arc welded to other metals such as steel. Very brittle intermetallic compounds are formed when metals such as steel, copper, magnesium or titanium are directly arc welded to aluminum. To avoid these brittle compounds, some special techniques have been developed to isolate the other metal from the molten aluminum during the arc welding process. The two most common methods of facilitating arc welding of aluminum to steel are bimetallic transition inserts and coating the dissimilar material prior to welding.

Bimetallic Transition Inserts: Bimetallic transition materials are available commercially in combinations of aluminum to such other materials as steel, stainless steel and copper. These inserts are best described as sections of material that are comprised of one part aluminum with another material already bonded to the aluminum. The method used for bonding these dissimilar materials together, and thus forming the bimetallic transition, are usually rolling, explosion welding, friction welding, flash welding or hot pressure welding, and not arc welding. The arc welding of these steel aluminum transition inserts can be performed by the normal arc welding methods such as GMAW or GTAW. One side of the insert is welded steel-to-steel and the other aluminum-to-aluminum. Care should be taken to avoid overheating the inserts during welding, which may cause growth of brittle intermetallic compounds at the steel-aluminum interface of the transition insert. It is good practice to perform the aluminum-to-aluminum weld first. In this way, we can provide a larger heat sink when the steel-to-steel welding is performed and help prevent the steel aluminum interface from overheating. The bimetallic transition insert is a popular method of joining aluminum to steel and is often used for producing welded connections of excellent quality within structural applications. Such applications as attaching aluminum deckhouses to steel decks on ships, for tube sheets in heat exchangers that have aluminum tubing with steel or stainless steel tube sheets, and for producing arc welded joints between aluminum and steel pipe lines.

Coating The Dissimilar Material Prior To Welding: A coating can be applied to steel to facilitate its arc welding to aluminum. One method is to coat the steel with aluminum. This is sometimes achieved by dip coating (hot dip aluminizing), or brazing the aluminum to the surface of the steel. Once coated, the steel member can be arc welded to the aluminum member, if care is taken to prevent the arc from impinging on the steel. A technique must be used during welding to direct the arc onto the aluminum member and allow the molten aluminum from the weld pool to flow onto the aluminum coated steel. Another method of joining aluminum to steel involves coating the steel surface with silver solder. The joint is then welded using aluminum filler alloy, taking care not to burn through the barrier layer of silver solder. Neither of these coating type joint methods are typically depended upon for full mechanical strength and are usually used for sealing purposes only.

How to Select Tungsten Electrode in TIG Welding (III): Lanthanated Tungsten (Gold 1.5% or Blue 2.0%)

Lanthanted Tungsten (Color Code: Gold 1.5% or Blue 2.0%)

Lanthanated tungsten electrodes (AWS classification EWLa-1.5 or EWLa-2.0) contain a minimum of 97.80 percent tungsten and 1.30 percent to 2.0 percent lanthanum, or lanthana, and are known as 1.5 percent or 2.0 percent lanthanated. These electrodes have excellent arc starting, a low burnoff rate, good arc stability, and excellent re-ignition characteristics—many of the same advantages as ceriated electrodes. Lanthanated electrodes also share the conductivity characteristics of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. In some cases, 1.5 percent lanthanated can replace 2 percent thoriated without having to make significant welding program changes.

Lanthanated tungsten electrodes are ideal if you want to optimize your welding capabilities. They work well on AC or DC electrode negative with a pointed end, or they can be balled for use with AC sine wave power sources. Lanthanated tungsten maintains a sharpened point well, which is an advantage for welding steel and stainless steel on DC or AC from square wave power sources.

Unlike thoriated tungsten, these electrodes are suitable for AC welding and, like ceriated electrodes, allow the arc to be started and maintained at lower voltages. Compared with pure tungsten, the addition of 1.5 percent lanthana increases the maximum current-carrying capacity by approximately 50 percent for a given electrode size.

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  Details: AWS Classification: ER308L

  • Manufacturer: WeldingCity
  • Size: 1/8″
  • Length: 36″
  • Weight: 1″ pounds
  • Typical Element Content (wt%) in Product: C<=0.03; Cr=19.50-22.00; Ni=9.00-11.00; Mo<=0.75; Cu<=0.75; Si=0.30-0.65; Mn=1.00-2.50; P<0.030; S<0.030; Fe=balance
  • We do WHOLESALE! Please call 770.609.8032 for details.
er308l stainless steel rod

  Features

This product can also be used for welding types 321 and 347 stainless steels
This wire is suitable for applications at cryogenic temperatures
AWS A5.9, welding current DCEP

  Item Description

ER308/308L is used for welding types 304, 304L, 308 and 308L stainless steels. It is very similar to type 308 but has a on content held to a max of .03%.

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Parts that Might Go Well With

TIG PARTS SELECTION CHART (STANDARD PARTS AND ACCESSORIES)
TORCH PART NUMBER FOR WP-9 (125A AIR COOLED) AND WP-20/WP-25 (250/200A WATER-COOLED)
Electrode Dia. (In) 0.020 0.040 1/16 3/32 1/8* 5/32*
Collet 13N20 13N21 13N22 13N23 13N24
Collet Body 13N25 13N26 13N27 13N28 13N29
Gas Lens 45V41 45V42 45V43 45V44 45V45
Large Dia. Gas Lens 45V0204S 45V116S 45V64S 995795S 45V63S
Ceramic Cup Nozzle #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #10 #12 #15
Regular Cup 13N08 13N09 13N10 13N11 13N12 13N13
Gas Lens Cup 53N58 53N59 53N60 53N61 53N61S
Lg. Dia Gas Lens Cup 57N75 57N74 53N88 53N87 53N89
Long Cup 796F70 796F71 796F72 796F73
Extra Long Cup 796F74 796F75 796F76 796F77
Extra-Extra Long Cup 796F79 796F80 796F81
Back Cap 41V33 41V35 41V24 41V24L
Short Medium Long Ex. Long
Gasket & Insulator 598882 54N63-20 9-4
Reg./Gas L Lg. Gas L Insert
Power Cable & Adapter 57Y01** 57Y03** 45V03 45V04 105Z57 45V11
WP9 12.5′ WP9 25′ WP20 12.5′ WP20 25′ WP9 WP20/25
Gas/Water Hose (WP-20/25) 45V09 45V10 45V07 45V08
Gas 12.5′ Gas 25′ Water 12.5′ Water 25′
TORCH PART NUMBER FOR WP-17/WP-26 (150/200A AIR COOLED) AND WP-18 (350A WATER-COOLED)
Electrode Dia. (In) 0.020 0.040 1/16 3/32 1/8* 5/32*
Collet 10N21 10N22 10N23 10N24 10N25 54N20
Collet Body 10N29 10N30 10N31 10N32 10N28 406488
Gas Lens 45V29 45V24 45V25 45V26 45V27 45V28
Large Dia. Gas Lens 45V0204 45V116 45V64 995795 45V63
Stubby Collet 10N21S 10N22S 10N23S 10N24S 10N25S
Stubby Collet Body 17CB20
Ceramic Cup Nozzle #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #10 #12 #15
Regular Cup 10N50 10N49 10N48 10N47 10N46 10N45 10N44
Gas Lens Cup 54N18 54N17 54N16 54N15 54N14 54N19
Lg. Dia Gas Lens Cup 57N75 57N74 53N88 53N87 53N89
Long Cup 10N50L 10N49L 10N48L 10N47L 10N46L
Long Gas Lens Cup 54N18L 54N17L 54N16L 54N15L 54N14L
Stubby Cup 13N08 13N09 13N10 13N11 13N12 13N13
Back Cap 57Y04 300M 57Y02
Short Medium Long
Gasket & Insulator 18CG 54N01 54N63 18CG-20 18-7
Regular Gas Lens Lg. Gas Lens Stubby Insert
Power Cable & Adapter 57Y01** 57Y03** 46V28** 46V30** 40V64 41V29 105Z57 45V62 45V11
WP17 12.5′ WP17 25′ WP26 12.5′ WP26 25′ WP18 12.5′ WP18 25′ WP17 WP26 WP18
Gas/Water Hose (WP-18) 40V75 41V30 40V74 41V32
Gas 12.5′ Gas 25′ Water 12.5′ Water 25′
* WP-9 and WP-17 usually does not use 1/8″ and up
** 1-piece style
WeldingCity is in no way affiliated with any listed manufactures/brands/part numbers, which are purely for customer convenience.

Space smells awful or awesome, depending where you’re floating

space smell

(* 🙂 Just read this article on CBS website. It is a pleasure to read. Therefore, I decided to share with you guys. Happy Weekend! 🙂 *)

We’ve yet to make contact with E.T., but human space exploration has given us at least a few surprising revelations, like the fact that the smells of space range from delicious to downright nasty.

Last year, the Rosetta mission taught us that the perfume of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a wretch-inducing bouquet of ammonia, hydrogen sulphide and other nasty gases that would smell like an unholy merger of an outhouse and rotten eggs.

But as the video below from Chemical & Engineering News sums up with an unabashedly geeky flair, not every aroma in space will destroy your appetite. In fact, astronauts returning to the International Space Station after a spacewalk reported smelling bacon and other whiffs of meat. And Apollo astronauts reported a scent on the moon like gun powder. Other astronauts have also described space scents similar to a spent fireplace, welding or burning ozone.

Sounds to me like the vacuum of space is just like gathering around one massive campfire, which is sort of what the sun is, when you think about it.

So what’s to keep astronauts in orbit from constantly craving a barbecue bacon cheeseburger? Fortunately, NASA has the means to keep the ISS smelling fresh, although it did take a few hours to filter out the fishy smell of seafood gumbo once.

What’s being missed here is the obvious opportunity for NASA to save a little cash on shipping breakfast meats to space. If you actually fried up some bacon in the already seared-pork-scented vacuum of space, you might be able to trick astronauts’ noses and palates into believing they got double the serving of bacon. Let’s keep this little secret just between you, me and the American taxpayers though, NASA. The astronauts don’t need to know…

TIG Torch Part Selection Chart

WE ALSO PROVIDE HIGH QUALITY LOW PRICE TIG TORCH PARTS AS THE FOLLOWING. PLEASE TYPE THE PART NUMBER IN THE SEARCH BOX IN OUR STORE TO FIND THEM. COMBINED SHIPPING IS AVAILABLE.
TORCH PART NUMBER FOR WP-9 (125A AIR COOLED) AND WP-20/WP-25 (250/200A WATER-COOLED)
Electrode Dia. (In) 0.020 0.040 1/16 3/32 1/8* 5/32*
Collet 13N20 13N21 13N22 13N23 13N24
Collet Body 13N25 13N26 13N27 13N28 13N29
Gas Lens 45V41 45V42 45V43 45V44 45V45
Large Dia. Gas Lens 45V0204S 45V116S 45V64S 995795S 45V63S
Ceramic Cup Nozzle #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #10 #12 #15
Regular Cup 13N08 13N09 13N10 13N11 13N12 13N13
Gas Lens Cup 53N58 53N59 53N60 53N61 53N61S
Lg. Dia Gas Lens Cup 57N75 57N74 53N88 53N87 53N89
Long Cup 796F70 796F71 796F72 796F73
Extra Long Cup 796F74 796F75 796F76 796F77
Extra-Extra Long Cup 796F79 796F80 796F81
Back Cap 41V33 41V35 41V24 41V24L
Short Medium Long Ex. Long
Gasket & Insulator 598882 54N63-20 9-4
Reg./Gas L Lg. Gas L Insert
Power Cable & Adapter 57Y01** 57Y03** 45V03 45V04 105Z57 45V11
WP9 12.5′ WP9 25′ WP20 12.5′ WP20 25′ WP9 WP20/25
Gas/Water Hose (WP-20/25) 45V09 45V10 45V07 45V08
Gas 12.5′ Gas 25′ Water 12.5′ Water 25′
TORCH PART NUMBER FOR WP-17/WP-26 (150/200A AIR COOLED) AND WP-18 (350A WATER-COOLED)
Electrode Dia. (In) 0.020 0.040 1/16 3/32 1/8* 5/32*
Collet 10N21 10N22 10N23 10N24 10N25 54N20
Collet Body 10N29 10N30 10N31 10N32 10N28 406488
Gas Lens 45V29 45V24 45V25 45V26 45V27 45V28
Large Dia. Gas Lens 45V0204 45V116 45V64 995795 45V63
Stubby Collet 10N21S 10N22S 10N23S 10N24S 10N25S
Stubby Collet Body 17CB20
Ceramic Cup Nozzle #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #10 #12 #15
Regular Cup 10N50 10N49 10N48 10N47 10N46 10N45 10N44
Gas Lens Cup 54N18 54N17 54N16 54N15 54N14 54N19
Lg. Dia Gas Lens Cup 57N75 57N74 53N88 53N87 53N89
Long Cup 10N50L 10N49L 10N48L 10N47L 10N46L
Long Gas Lens Cup 54N18L 54N17L 54N16L 54N15L 54N14L
Stubby Cup 13N08 13N09 13N10 13N11 13N12 13N13
Back Cap 57Y04 300M 57Y02
Short Medium Long
Gasket & Insulator 18CG 54N01 54N63 18CG-20 18-7
Regular Gas Lens Lg. Gas Lens Stubby Insert
Power Cable & Adapter 57Y01** 57Y03** 46V28** 46V30** 40V64 41V29 105Z57 45V62 45V11
WP17 12.5′ WP17 25′ WP26 12.5′ WP26 25′ WP18 12.5′ WP18 25′ WP17 WP26 WP18
Gas/Water Hose (WP-18) 40V75 41V30 40V74 41V32
Gas 12.5′ Gas 25′ Water 12.5′ Water 25′
   * WP-9 and WP-17 usually does not use 1/8″ and up
   ** 1-piece style
WeldingCity is in no way affiliated with any listed manufactures/brands/part numbers, which are purely for customer convenience.